Dad: The Man, The Myth, The Legend (Mifflin Lowe)

Hello, friends! Our book today is Dad: The Man, The Myth, The Legend, written by Mifflin Lowe and illustrated by Dani Torrent, a fun tribute to the unique awesomeness of dads.

A young bespectacled boy welcomes the reader by proudly presenting the one, the only – his Dad! A man of practically supernatural strength, genius intellect, the courage of a lion and a heart of pure gold. He does all manner of incredible things; for instance last week, when he saved the boy from the attack of a massive jungle python (afterwards necessitating the purchase of a new garden hose). He makes the boy’s favorite dinner: spaghetti with M&M’s, chocolate sauce and potato chips (Mom’s on standby with the takeout menu, no reason why). He can even FLY (sure, technically on a trampoline… that he technically broke during his landing). But perhaps best of all, he’s supportive, encouraging, nurturing, and an all-around great dad – and truly, that’s all he needs to be a hero in his son’s eyes.

Very sweet. Beginning with a comedically grandiose version of “superhero” dad, this sweet tale unfolds with humor and fondness, gradually moving past the more er, exaggerated escapades of Dad to the simple and sweet things that show his devotion to his family (a personal favorite was a scene in which the son, devastated by an embarrassingly bad haircut, is cheered up by his father proudly getting a matching one). There are plenty of nudges and winks to adults that make this a great tale for old and young bookworms to share, and the charming mid-century-inspired art is packed with personality. The length was fine for a storytime, and JJ enjoyed the family’s antics. A delightful ode to an everyday superhero, and it’s Baby Bookworm approved.

(Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)

Wild About Dads (Diana Murray)

Hello, friends! Our book today is Wild About Dads, written by Diana Murray and illustrated by Amber Alvarez, a sweet celebration of the dads of the animal world.

Dads are great at lots of things: they can help their kids to reach up high, they play games, they carry little ones on piggyback, and so much more! But it’s not only human dads who can do these wonderful things: dads in the animal kingdom do them too! Over a dozen animal dads are shown doing things with their little ones, like sharing snacks (pelicans), fetching dinner (red foxes), and giving a bath (African wild dogs). Bookended with scenes of human dads playing with their kids at a playground tie the theme together: “There’s a lot that dads can do. The best of all is loving you!”

Fun and educational. Young animal enthusiasts will love learning the factoids about the animal dads, explored briefly in the jaunty rhyming text and expanded upon in the endpapers. I especially liked that animals included a few lesser-known creatures; animal-crazy JJ was delighted to learn about Bearded Emperor Tamarins Sandhill Cranes. The artwork is lush, colorful and very cute, drawing the animals with endearing, cartoonish features that make them all look especially cuddly-cute. The length was perfect for any age, and JJ loved it! This would be a great one for dads to share with their own little critters, and we highly recommend it. Baby Bookworm approved!

(Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)

Papa Brings Me The World (Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw)

Hello, friends! Our book today is Papa Brings Me The World by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw, a story of a father and daughter and the adventurous spirit they share.

Lu’s Papa is not like other Papas. While some fathers take their car or a bus or a train to work, Lu’s Papa travels much further than most; he is a photojournalist, and travels around the world to take pictures of places and things that most of us have never seen before. When he returns from his journeying, he always brings a gift for Lu, be it a bit of the local currency, a musical instrument, a new pen pal, or even simply his journals, filled with stories and drawings of far-away places. Lu often misses her Papa, especially on special days, but she would never wish him to stop traveling; like her, he has a wanderlust too compelling, and she looks forward to the day they can travel the world together.

Very sweet. This look at a unique father-daughter relationship, based on the author/illustrator’s real-life father, tells a simple yet sweet story that is as much about travel and exploration as it is about family. The treasures and tales that Lu’s father brings her are fascinating; stories about cairns in the Andes and games of “Semut, Orang, Gajah” in Sumatra draw in the reader as much as they do Lu (in fact, a clever illustration reveals how to play “Semut, Orang, Gajah”, letting readers participate in the joy of discovery). The art is rich and textured, and tells as much of the story as the text does with color, pattern, and style. It is a bit lengthy for younger bookworms; JJ was losing focus near the end, though she enjoyed the detailed artwork very much. A tender tale of family that opens up a world of exploration, and we liked it. Baby Bookworm approved.

(Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)

Daddies Do (Lezlie Evans)

Hello, friends! Our book today is Daddies Do, written by Lezlie Evans and illustrated by Elisa Ferro, a sweet ode to fathers and all the ways they show love and care for their little ones.

Daddies do so much. They build and fix, cook and teach, wash and joke, and so much more. They’re in the front row of your school play, clapping and showing their support. They wrestle and even pretend that you are stronger so you can win. They measure you as you grow, and sometimes fall asleep reading you bedtime stories. And who helps get you washed up, dressed in your pajamas and tucked into bed? “Daddies do, that’s who!”

Cheerfully sweet. Using bouncy rhyming text with a simple rhythm and a refrain that kids can join in on, we are given a wide range of ways that dads show care for their children. I especially liked that, in addition to more traditional “daddy duties” like roughhousing, building, and playing sports, there were more nurturing activities included like cooking or comforting their child when sick. The illustrations, showing a jungle full of animal daddies and their children, are colorful and engaging, and have some wonderful details that kids will love. The length is perfect for a bookworm of any size, and JJ adored the art. This is a great book for any daddy to share with their own little cub, and it’s Baby Bookworm approved!

(Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)

Dad And The Dinosaur (Gennifer Choldenko)


Hello, friends! Today’s book is Dad And The Dinosaur, written by Gennifer Choldenko and illustrated by Dan Santat, a poignant story about fear, courage, and the bond between fathers and sons.

Nicholas is afraid of some things: the dark, the bushes where the big bugs live, the world under the manhole covers, even the opposing soccer team’s big goalie. But Nicholas has a secret to overcoming his fears: his dinosaur. He keeps his dinosaur with him always, in his pockets or tucked in his sock, because the dinosaur is never scared of anything and helps make Nicholas feel brave. That is, until the day that Nick loses his dinosaur on the soccer field and must return home through the scary dark before he is able to find him. Nicholas is too embarrassed to reveal that his dinosaur was the one making him brave, but if he doesn’t tell someone, how will he ever get his dinosaur back? All seems lost… until Nicholas’s dad, Big Nick, is able to find a way to help his son.

This one was really beautiful. There are some wonderful lessons to take away: that it’s okay to feel afraid, and that opening up to your parents when you’re upset, even if you find your problem embarrassing, means that they can often help you and are more than happy to. I didn’t love that Nicholas felt that he couldn’t show weakness to his mother, but it did foster the trusting bond between him and his father, so it’s easy to overlook. Santat’s art is a perfect fit here, mixing the real world with the sublime seamlessly, using color and atmosphere to bring Nicholas’s imagination to life. The length is great, and JJ and I both really enjoyed this one. A touching story, especially for fathers to share with sons, and it’s Baby Bookworm approved!