Top 5: Books About Moms

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Hello, friends! We’re wrapping up May, so it’s time for another Top 5 list! Since this past month we celebrated both Mother’s Day and my birthday, I decided to be a little indulgent with this Top 5. So for this month’s list, we’ve rounded up our favorite books about moms. Be she mom, mommy, mama, or mother, there’s no denying the special bond a mother has with her child, and the books we’ve chosen for this list celebrate that connection.

So here we go: our Top 5 Books About Moms:

1. Silly Wonderful You (Sherri Duskey Rinker)

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This was actually the book we read for Mother’s Day this year, and it was a perfect pick. Told through the eyes of a (mostly) patient mother’s daily life with her rambunctious toddler, this book captures the highs, lows, messes, smells, laughs, tears, and wonders of being mother to a little one. Patrick McDonnell of Mutts fame uses his signature pen-and-ink illustrations to captures each preposterous and precious moment with joy and tenderness. It’s a sweet, funny yet sentimental book that makes for a perfect bedtime read, and it’s one of our new favorites.

2. The Runaway Bunny (Margaret Wise Brown)

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A classic tale from the same author/illustrator duo as Goodnight Moon, this touching and timeless tale is, in some ways, better than its more famous counterpart. A young bunny tells his mother that he is going to run away, going on grand adventures and becoming impossible things, and that he will leave her behind. The mother bunny knows better, however; no matter where he goes or what he becomes, she will always be with him in one way or another. The young bunny is comforted by this, deciding to stay put and be her little bunny instead. It’s a beautifully symbolic tale of a mother’s unconditional love, with art by Clement Hurd that still astounds after 75 years.

3. Love Is (Diane Adams)

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This book still brings a tear to my eye. Told in delicate rhyme and accompanied by flawless illustrations by Claire Keane, Love Is tells the story of motherhood to children by disguising it as a story about a pet duckling. A little girl finds a lost duckling, taking her in and caring for her. Through midnight feedings, messy bathtimes, and moments of fear and joy, the girl watches her duckling grow. And once the duckling is ready, though it pains her heart, she knows that it is time to let her little one out to explore the world on its own. This one is especially nice because, using the duckling metaphor, it shows that motherhood is not strictly a biological connection. It’s a gorgeous, touching, and timeless story that takes on new meaning with each read.

4. Still My Mommy (Megan Pomputius)

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Sometimes parents, whom little ones typically regard as indestructible, have health issues, and it can be a frightening time for an entire family. Still My Mommy, which author Pomputius based on her own experience with cancer, aims to comfort children through the scary, confusing, and difficult experience of watching a parent deal with a serious illness. Subdued and gentle art by Andrea Alemanno fits the tone of the book perfectly. While introducing some elements of cancer treatment, the most important part of this book is the message: that illness may change a loved one physically, mentally or emotionally, but they will always be the same person underneath. As the little girl in the book discovers, while her mother may be thinner and lose her hair, or may not be able to run and play as they once did, she will still always want to be with her little girl, because she is still her mommy.

5. Little One (Jo Weaver)

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A gorgeous tale of motherhood told through some of the most breathtaking art we’ve seen in a children’s book, Little One follows a mother bear and her cub through a year of their lives. As the seasons pass, the bear cub makes discoveries about his world and himself, always with his mother by his side to help and guide him. As the year draws to a close, the pair bed down in their den once more for a winter’s sleep, together as always. It’s a classic tale of mother and child, but the real star of the show here is the phenomenal charcoal art, which captures both the beauty of nature and motherhood with stunning detail. It’s a peaceful, calm, and touching book about a mother’s love.

There you have it! A Top 5 list of books perfect for mothers to share with their baby bookworms. We also wanted to add one honorable mention:  Stella Brings The Family by Miriam B. Schiffer is a beautiful story about how maternal influences need not always be from a mother, or even female. We wanted to include it for families who may not have a mother in their lives; motherhood is not necessarily a bond made by genetics, but it is always one made by love.

So, what do you think? Did we miss any of your favorites? Do you have a book about mothers you would like to recommend to us? Let us know in the comments, or message us from our Contact page. Thanks so much, and happy reading!

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Silly Wonderful You (Sherri Duskey Rinker)


Hello friends, and happy Mother’s Day! In honor of the occasion, we read a favorite from our own library: Silly Wonderful You, written by Sherri Duskey Rinker and illustrated by Patrick McDonnell. It’s an adorable celebration of moms and their little ones, and the joys, frustrations, and incomparable rewards of motherhood.

As narrator, a mother addresses her young toddler about how much life has changed since the little girl came to be. She notes that ever since there was her, the house was never so messy or LOUD! The mother could never have predicted just how many stuffed animals would move in with her daughter, or how wonderful her glitter-and-glue artworks would be. She never would have imagined the splashy baths or the sticky messes or the impromptu frolics in the park. And now that life has changed so drastically in the wake of her boisterous, joyful, aggravating, unique child? She simply wouldn’t want to imagine things any other way.

This is a classic love letter about mother and child, and it’s an absolutely lovely one. The text has an unusual cadence, using rhymes and onomatopoeia as emphasis rather than throughout, but it fits the theme of the somewhat chaotic nature of raising a toddler. Fans of McConnell’s comic strip Mutts will recognize his distinctive pen-and-ink drawings, and he draws each preposterous and precious moment with obvious fondness and care. The length is perfect, it’s one of JJ’s favorite bedtime stories, and it always warms my heart by the last page. A fabulous story for mommies and their little ones, and it’s absolutely Baby Bookworm approved!

(Note: Our copy of this book was gifted to The Baby Bookworm by the author. This does not affect the impartiality of our review.)

Love Is (Diane Adams)


Hello, friends! For our last book of February, we picked Love Is, written by Diane Adams and illustrated by Claire Keane, a gorgeous and touching story about parenthood.

Told in delicate rhyme, the story follows a little girl who finds a lost duckling, taking her in and caring for her. Through midnight feedings, messy bathtimes, and playful and quiet moments both, the reader watches the bond between the girl and her pet grow, just as the duckling does. Soon, it is time for her beloved duckling to move on to a bigger pond. And while she misses her little yellow friend, she knows that their love will always remain, and even grow.

I completely teared up at this one. On the surface, the tale of little girl and her tiny duckling is the story of the work and care that goes into both friendship and beloved pet. Yet adult readers do not have to look far below the surface to find a moving allegory for a parent’s love: dealing with the joys, frustrations and heartbreaks of watching your tiny love grow and change and, eventually, move on to the bigger world. Keane’s illustrations are as charming as always, with her color palette for Love Is being fondly reminiscent of children’s books from the early mid-century, which gives the art a lovely, nostalgic touch. The rhythm of the text is great, and the length is perfect, and JJ loved the story and the bright yellow ducks. This one is all heart, and might even bring a sentimental tear to your eye. We absolutely loved it, and it’s Baby Bookworm approved!